Essays

Most of us have grown up with the idea that large states have more influence in the selection of a President than small states because of the peculiarities of our electoral system. The big states do wield significant power on Election Day because of the all-or- nothing quality of the electoral college vote. But there is, in fact, an even greater inequality of influence among the states during the nominating process-the state conventions, caucuses, and pri- mary elections. This particular inequality c...

As always when a new administration settles in, there is specula- tion in Washington over the Supreme Court-its future direction, possible vacancies, presidential appointees. The nine Justices often surprise Presidents. As the makeup and outlook of the Court change, the Justices do not always decide constitutional cases along predictable ideological lines. The Court's decisions have shaped America's history; in no other nation is the highest court so powerful. Here, political scientist Alpheus...

"I have always been regarded by the United States establishment as an oddball, and I am a strange mixture of a reactionary and a liberal," George Kennan said in a lengthy Encounter interview last September. "It is perfectly true that in my attitude toward what is going on in the United States and Western civilization . . . I am worried and profoundly pessimistic."
Long a student of Russia, Mr. Kennan w...

Stephen Hess
Twice I have served on White House staffs-at the end of one administration (1959-61) and at the beginning of another (1969). All presidencies, of course, are different. But one could hardly fail to observe differences that were exclusively a product of time. Beginnings and endings are different. There are differences of pace, attitude, objectives, and response, not only between adminis- trations but also within each one.
What follows is a composite portrait of a President over the...

Pages