How the World Views America

Table of Contents

In Essence

"What Happened to Sex Scandals? Politics and Peccadilloes, Jefferson to Kennedy" by John H. Summers, in The Journal of American History (Dec. 2000), 1215 E. Atwater Ave., Bloomington, Ind. 47401–3703.

"Does Federalism Have a Future?" by Pietro S. Nivola, in The Public Interest (Winter 2001), 1112 16th St., N.W., Ste. 530, Washington, D.C. 20036.

"Come Partly Home, America" by Michael O’Hanlon, in Foreign Affairs (Mar.–Apr. 2001), 58 E. 68th St., New York, N.Y. 10021.

"Europe’s Aversion to NMD" by Justin Bernier and Daniel Keohane, in Strategic Review (Winter 2001), United States Strategic Institute, 67 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 02215.

"Does the ‘New Economy’ Measure up to the Great Inventions of the Past?" by Robert J. Gordon, in Journal of Economic Perspectives (Fall 2000), American Economic Assn., 2014 Broadway, Ste. 305, Nashville, Tenn. 37203–2418.

"The Development of the Neoclassical Tradition in Labor Economics" by George R. Boyer and Robert S. Smith, in Industrial and Labor Relations Review (Jan. 2001), Cornell Univ., Ithaca, N.Y. 14853–3901.

"The First Bank of the United States and the Securities Market Crash of 1792" by David J. Cowen, in The Journal of Economic History (Dec. 2000), Social Science History Institute, Bldg. 200, Rm. 3, Stanford Univ., Stanford, Calif. 94305–2024.

"Small Towns, Mass Society, and the 21st Century" by James D. Wright, in Society (Nov.–Dec. 2000), Rutgers—The State Univ., 35 Berrue Circle, Piscataway, N.J. 08854.

"Reforming Welfare Reform" by Jared Bernstein and Mark Greenberg, in The American Prospect (Jan. 1–15, 2001), 5 Broad St., Boston, Mass. 02109–2901.

"Were the Perpetrators of Genocide ‘Ordinary Men’ or ‘Real Nazis’? Results from Fifteen Hundred Biographies" by Michael Mann, in Holocaust and Genocide Studies (Winter 2000), Dept. of Academic Publications, Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, 100 Raoul Wallenberg Place, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024–2126.

"Giving It Away" by John Morton, in American Journalism Review (Jan.–Feb. 2001), Univ. of Maryland, 1117 Journalism Bldg., College Park, Md. 20742–7111.

"Think Tanks in the U.S. Media" by Andrew Rich and R. Kent Weaver, in Press/Politics (Fall 2000), Kennedy School of Government, Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. 02138.

"Thomistic Natural Law as Darwinian Natural Right" by Larry Arnhart, in Social Philosophy & Policy (Winter 2001), Social Philosophy and Policy Center, Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, Ohio 43403.

"The Intellectual Appeal of the Reformation" by David C. Steinmetz, in Theology Today (Jan. 2001), P.O. Box 29, Princeton, N.J. 08542.



The Reluctant Sectarians

"The Intellectual Appeal of the Reformation" by David C. Steinmetz, in Theology Today (Jan. 2001), P.O. Box 29, Princeton, N.J. 08542.


cules that "could prove invaluable in discovering new drugs or diagnosing disease."

Matt Cartmill, in The Key Reporter (Autumn 2000), Phi Beta Kappa Society, 1785 Massachusetts Ave., N.W., Fourth Floor, Washington, D.C. 20036. Is consciousness unique to humans, or do other animals also possess it? Scientists-who arc generally reluctant to deal with so subjective a thing as consciousness-are divided on the question. But Cartmill, a professor of biolog- ical anthropology and anatomy at Duke University Medical Center, thinks that the form of unconsciousness known as sleep offers s...

Matt Cartmill, in The Key Reporter (Autumn 2000), Phi Beta Kappa Society, 1785 Massachusetts Ave., N.W., Fourth Floor, Washington, D.C. 20036. Is consciousness unique to humans, or do other animals also possess it? Scientists-who arc generally reluctant to deal with so subjective a thing as consciousness-are divided on the question. But Cartmill, a professor of biolog- ical anthropology and anatomy at Duke University Medical Center, thinks that the form of unconsciousness known as sleep offers s...

their very nature, contain novels; yet novels can contain history' and philosophy. We need not quarrel about which genre is supe- rior; all are essential to huii1an striving. But somehow it is enchanting to think that the magic sack of make-believe, if one wills it so, can always be fuller and fatter than anything the historians and philosophers can supply. Make-believe, with its useless- ness and triviality, with all its falseness, is nevertheless freqz~ei~tl)praised for telling the truth via...

"China, the West, and World History in Joseph Needham’s Science and Civilisation in China" Robert Finlay, in Journal of World History (Fall 2000), Univ. of Hawaii Press, 2840 Kolowalu St., Honolulu, Hawaii 96822. Thanks to British scholar Joseph Needham’s monumental Science and Civilisation in China (1954–98), westerners have a whole new appreciation of China’s richly inventive past. Especially compelling was his account of 15thcentury Chinese expeditions to Southeast Asia and, through...

David A. Shirk, in Journal of Democracy (Oct. 2000). 1101 15th St.,N.W., Ste. 802, Washington, D.C. 20005. Mexico's new president, Vicente Fox, ended decades of rule the Institutional Revolutionary Party (I'RI) when he took office last December. The country is enter- ing a new era-and many fear that Fox's National Action Party (PAN) is, at bottom, a reactionary party. It isn't, contends political scientist Shirk, a former visiting fellow at the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies, at the University o...

Book Reviews

DUTY FAITHFULLY PERFORMED: Robert E. Lee and His Critics. By John M. Taylor. Brassey’s. 268 pp. $18.95

THE MAKING OF ROBERT E. LEE. By Michael Fellman. Random House. 360 pp. $29.95

DEEP IN OUR HEARTS: Nine White Women in the Freedom Movement. By Constance Curry, Joan C. Browning, Dorothy Dawson Burlage, Penny Patch, Theresa Del Pozzo, Sue Thrasher, Elaine DeLott Baker, Emmie Schrader Adams, and Casey Hayden. Univ. of Georgia Press. 400 pp. $29.95
FREEDOM’S DAUGHTERS: The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement from 1830 to 1970. By Lynne Olson. Scribner. 460 pp. $30

READING LYRICS. Edited by Rovert Gottlieb and Robert Kimball. Pantheon. 706 pp. $39.50

CARSON MCCULLERS: A Life. By Josyane Savigneau; transl. by Joan E. Howard. Houghton Mifflin. 370 pp. $30

DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA. By Alexis de Tocqueville; transl. by Harvey C. Mansfield and Delba Winthrop. Univ. of Chicago Press. 722 pp. $35

Essays

To the French, the winner of the American presidential election in 2000 was Bill Clinton. Political commentators...

Denis Lacorne

In a recent survey of Chinese attitudes toward America, the respondents--a cross-section of Chinese society--were...

Wang Jisi

Fifteen years ago, as I was setting off to visit the United States for my first extended stay, a knowledgeable...

Peter Schneider

Mexico's perceptions of the United States have changed very little during the past five decades. What has undergone a total transformation, however, is the atmosphere in which they are formed. This change reached its culmination with the defeat of the long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) at the polls on July 2, 2000, and the presidential victory of Vicente Fox....

Sergio Aguayo

When Russia began emerging from decades of international isolation and confrontation with the West in the years...

Yuri Levada

Did the popular belief that the CIA was involved in the Kennedy assassination grow from a seed planted by the Soviet KGB?

Max Holland

Human beings can´t help but ask the big philosophical questions, even if they know that the answers will come up short.

Mark Kingwell

A scholarly effort to tally the human cost of communism around the world has stirred enormous controversy. One of its authors explains why.

Andrzej Paczkowski

Twenty-five years ago, Illinois scientist Carl Woese identified an entirely new form of life. His discovery upended the traditional notion that all living things on Earth fall into five kingdoms andchallenged our understanding of evolution and the origin of life. All he had to do was persuade his fellow scientists.

David W. Wolfe

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