What is Nature Worth?

Table of Contents

In Essence

dpdf-doc>Reviews ofarticles from periodicals and specialized journals here am1 abroadPolitics Government' 83 Foreign Policy & Defense Sj Economics, Labor & Business 88 Society 91 Press & ~ediaqjOdReIigion & l'I7iIo~u~I1~? 7qq Science, 1ecI111oIo~~& Environment 102 Arts & Letters 105 Other Nations11 Surrey of Recent Articlesmid all the uncertainty that fol-lowed September 11, one thing seemed predictable: The periodical press would soon be full of retrospectives...

David Brooks, in The Atlantic Monthly (Dec. 2001), ',O. Box 37585. Booiic. la. 50037-0585.On election night 2000, Americans were transfixed hvospectacles: one in Florida, the other on tine electoral maps shown on the TV newscasts. The maps seemed to depict two Americas: The coasts were colored blue, incli- eating states that had voted for A1 Gore; the heartland was almost entirely red, indicating support there for GOP candidate George Bush.There are two main theories about what divides Americans,...

David Brooks, in The Atlantic Monthly (Dec. 2001), ',O. Box 37585. Booiic. la. 50037-0585.On election night 2000, Americans were transfixed hvospectacles: one in Florida, the other on tine electoral maps shown on the TV newscasts. The maps seemed to depict two Americas: The coasts were colored blue, incli- eating states that had voted for A1 Gore; the heartland was almost entirely red, indicating support there for GOP candidate George Bush.There are two main theories about what divides Americans,...

writes, "that they con-ceived of the vice president as a runner-up presidential can- didate."Whatever illusions re-inclined were clispclled the election of 1800, which resulted in an Electoral sole congressman from Delaware and a Federalist, withheld his state's vote from Burr, allowing Jefferson to prevail. Ba!xcl explained that lie had acted "so as not to hazard the Constitution."Yet the presidency would never achieve the independence the Founders imagined. For much of...

25 percent when slhe became an incumbent." Even in white-majority cities, black incumbents running against white challengers were reelected 74 percent of the time. Having a black mayor also seemed to change white attitudes on racial issues over time. Most change occurred among white Democrats, some among white moderates, and little or none among white Republicans. "Black leadership means even greater divisions between Democrats and Republicans," concludes Hajnal.What effect does...

THE SOURCE: "Introduction to the Korean War" by Allan R. Millett, in The Journal of Military History (Oct. 2001), George C. Marshall Library, Lexington, Va. 24450–1600.

Allan I<. Millett, in T/;e Journcll of\'lilitan Histon (Oct. 2001 ), George C. Marshall Library, L,cxinglon, \'a. 24450-1600. If it's thought of at all, the Korean War is nists "subverted and betrayed" a popular seen in the United States chiefly as a 'proxy in nationalist association captained their rivals. the cold war conflict." In fact it was at once a war The Korean War really began in 1945, of l,o~t~oio~~ial...

e Periodical 012servertioiicil issues on \\hie11 tlie United States and L'.nropc have failcd to see eve to eve. "In a solid bloc," -\Iatlie\\'s savs, "the European Union (FA1) approved, and the United States did not, the creiitio~i of the l~iter~ieitioi"iil Criminal-Court (ICC;), the Kyoto Protocol on climate change. the ban on antipersonnel land mines, the biocliversity treaty, and a verification inecli- anisni for the Biological Weapons Control Trea~."7,I hcse...

> this past March, the 500,000- member carpenters union pulled out of the AFL,-ClO. Moberg, a senior editor of In 'I'hese 'l'i~nes,isn't inclined to blame Swccne!. for all these woes. Since S\veene!. deposed the lackluster Lane Kii-Hand, organized labor has become "noticeably more cffcctive ill giving workers...

several different factors. Most notably, women were most unclei-rcprescntecl in the biggest corporations, which also offer the biggest pa!, packages. The women in the stucl!,'l'lie man who gave us corporate re-engineering has a nev. idea. Call it the mating of the giant corporations.r 11lie aptly named Hammer, head of the Hammer and Company consulting finii, was an early advocate of breaking down the walls between units of the corporation, "getting peo- ple to work together and share...

inclivicl~~,ism.I'r 71he contemporary notion actually began as a term of abuse, observes McClay, who holds the Sun Trust Bank Chair of Excellence in Humanities at the University ofr 7lennessee at Chattanooga. Joseph cle Mciistre employed it in the 19th century to describe the most reprehensible aspects of the French Revolution, including a doctrine of natural rights that allowed any individual to be his own moral arbiter. A few years later, Tocq~~evilledescribed individualism as asocial...

" 1)). Peter Druekcr, in The Economist (Nov. 3, 2001), P.O. Box 58524, Boulder. Colo. 80322-8524. '3 >1 lie new economy may or may not materialize, but there is no doubt that the next society will be with us shortly," pre- dicts- Druc~cer, the noted author and pro- fessor of social science and management at Clarcmont Graduate University.Demography is the driving force behind Druckcr's new society. The rapid aging of the populations of the United States and other developed nations m...

" 1)). Peter Druekcr, in The Economist (Nov. 3, 2001), P.O. Box 58524, Boulder. Colo. 80322-8524. '3 > 1 lie new economy may or may not materialize, but there is no doubt that the next society will be with us shortly," pre- dicts- Druc~cer, the noted author and pro- fessor of social science and management at Clarcmont Graduate University.Demography is the driving force behind Druckcr's new society. The rapid aging of the populations of the United States and other developed na...

Periodical ObserverEXCERPTIn 88 B.C. King Mithridates VI of l'ontus invaded Roman territory in Asia Minor. He encouraged Asian debtors to kill their Roman creditors. Happy to reduce their credit card bills, the Asians massacred 80,000 Romans.Ethnic conflict is a tragic constant of human history, still very much in the news today, from the Balkans to Central Africa to Indonesia to Nigeria. Ethnic conflict has a peaceful political dimension as well as the more publicized violent dimension....

nation's biggest experiment with choice, but it's too soon to judge results.7 31 he best &dies of voucher programs- which generally allow parents the widestarray of school choices to put their kids in any school, public or private-show "mod-est to moderate test score improvements for some,-bit not all, students who partic- ipate." In New York City, programs that allow students to choose to attend certain public schools within their local school district appear to have helped...

local forces. And the press increasingly q~icstioned the govern- inent's policies, especially on tlie home front.In the Columbia Journalism Review ('Nov.-Dec. 2001); lawyer and civil liberties ticlvocate Floyd Abrains \\'rites, "I am more concerned that vve will fail to take terrorism seriously enough than that we will fail to pro- tect our liberties diligently enough." But as Washington ine~itabl!. encroaches on the pri- vacy of citizens, press scrutiny becomes ever more important....

Periodical Observerand diaries \\reslc!'-Methoclism -\\.as also part of the Enlightenment. The Meth- odists socialized religion and inculcated a gospel of good works, as reflected, for example, in their efforts to educate the poor. Already tending to the same worthy ends, both moral philosophy and religion were reinforced 1)). the new political ceon- om!. of natural liberty. For Adam Smith, "self-interest was a moral principle con-ducive to the general interest," and the general interest...

comparison withwhat occurred elsewhere in the Western incl~~s-trialized world. His second hope is that histo-rians will sharpen the discussion of seculariza-tion using instead, in some specificcontexts, the term "cle-Christianization,"which is a more accurate way of representingwhat has occurred. After all, the seculariz t' a 1011to which church historians refer is most often"the decline in authority of one specific cultural program-that of Christianity."Hollinger's...

Ronald VV. D\vorkin, in Policy Review (Aug. & Sept. 2001), 1050 15th St.,N.W., 11th fl., Washington, 11.C.20005.Skeptics can't ~inderstand the allure of alter- native medicine. Why would patients flock to therapies imptoveil science? Yet Americans spent more than $21 billion on alternative mcdicine in 1997, and last year spent more money for alternative therapies than they spent out-of-pocket in the entire mainstream medical system. Dworkin, a physician and a senior fel- low at the Hudson...

government, toward those who have found something of Whatever policies emerge, says Dworkin, value in alternative medicine.""Editor's Column" Walter A. h4eDougal1, in Orhis (Summer 2001), Foreign Policy Research Inst., 1528 Walnut St., Stc. 610, Philadelphia, Pa. 19102-3684.Mention Jules Verne (1828-1905), and most overthrew the monarchy, and Verne embraced people think of the visionary novelist who, the liberal revolution. He walked away from law, among other things, foretold...

p;r religio~i." 1311t A~~C~IOLI~IIIS:I>.S tliilt \/e~-~ie "frankly romanticised science and technology as fain- lands liberating his middle-class readers (and himself) from the tedium of modern url~nlife."What accounts for tlic tone of pessimism that crept into Verne's work in his later years? Partly, thinks MeDoiigll, it was due to per- sonal misfortu~~c:His wife became an invalid, and his only son, Mieliel, became a rake. 13~~ 1890, Vcrne \\,as suffering fi-oni facial neuralgia,...

the litem17. features of tlic work." The book is a kind of triumphant. unholy "rail for Kieran-"a novel which aims to be and is only iipprcciable as pornographic art."llonbtm<i'homas" I)!, Riclicircl 13. V\'oocl\viircl, in l.inpi 1"ri:incu: 'Ihe Review ojAcc1cIe177ic l,ije 10d.2001 1, Academic Partners L.l,C, H5Madison Ave., Nev York. X.Y. 10016.rhe celebrated American painter Thomas Eakins (1844-1916) had troubles enough, especially of a sexual sort, while he...

Murray Scot Tanner, in Current his to^ iScpt. 2001), 4225 Main Sl.. Philadelphia, Pa. 19127,Ever since the 1989protests in Tiananmcii Square, China's rulers have worked hard to suppressdissent. iincl with the possible exception ofthe Falun Gong, these efforts have largely suc- ceeded. But Tanner, a professor of Chinese and East Asian politics at Western Michigan University, sees "signs of erosion" in China's internal security strategy. Beijing's control over Chinese society is slipping,...

Murray Scot Tanner, in Current his to^ iScpt. 2001), 4225 Main Sl.. Philadelphia, Pa. 19127,Ever since the 1989protests in Tiananmcii Square, China's rulers have worked hard to suppressdissent. iincl with the possible exception ofthe Falun Gong, these efforts have largely suc- ceeded. But Tanner, a professor of Chinese and East Asian politics at Western Michigan University, sees "signs of erosion" in China's internal security strategy. Beijing's control over Chinese society is slipping,...

Book Reviews

POETRY SPEAKS: Hear Great Poets Read Their Work from Tennyson to Plath. Edited by Elise Paschen and Rebekah Presson Mosby; Dorninique Raccah, series editor. Narrated Ly Charles Osgood. Sourcebooks. 336 pp. plus 3 CDs. $49.95

MEMOIRS: A Twentieth-Century Journey in Science and Politics. By Edward Teller with Judith L.Shoolery.Perseus. 628 pp. $35

Essays

Today´s museum buildings get more attention than the exhibits they house.

Jayne Merkel

Why did so few Islamic leaders forthrightly condemn the attacks of September 11? It´s the latest symptom of a crisis of authority that has been building for more than a century--and which now must be resolved.

Richard W. Bulliet

Popular sovereignty is the foundation of the American political system, but the nation's leaders--from James Madison to Abraham Lincoln and Ronald Reagan--have been divided over its meaning for practical government.

Michael Lind

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